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Sunday, August 28, 2016

Sonic Youth: Daydream Nation (IAS #35)

A tough album to write about, but, to the best of my avantgarde-cracking abilities, here it is:

Sonic Youth: Daydream Nation

5 comments:

  1. Funny how the most interesting albums in the series get the lowest score from George...

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    1. Yes, of course, "Daydream Nation" is SO much more interesting than "Remain In Light" or "Unknown Pleasures", it's not even funny.

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  2. You did kind of drop the ball on In the Aeoplane Over the Sea.

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    1. Well, I fail to see how In The Aeroplane Over The Sea could be called one of "the most interesting albums" in the series. Unless by "interesting" one means "little known outside the hipster community", in which case there might be a glimpse of truth to the accusation, but it's not as if I ever subscribed to that community in the first place.

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  3. Great review. I think your idea of the "secret" to SY's critical success-- the band's lionization of certain canonical rock figures-- is dead on. It's why I like "Daydream Nation" better than any of their other albums (with "Goo" and maybe "Washing Machine" behind it). As art rock goes, it's incredibly rocking and aggressive and dramatic and thrilling. I don't know how any student of punk rock could resist the intro to "Teen Age Riot"... the jangle pop, the spoken word mutterings, the humongous guitar flourishes, Steve Shelley's epic drumming... Just perfect. But I think every song here has a little something to offer, especially (cuz you hardly mentioned em) "Cross the Breeze" (just savage guitar interplay / Kim vocal) and "Hey Joni" (the post-bridge freakout brought on by Lee's "Kick It!"... classic). If it "Daydream" a "road trip," as you say (and it's a good analogy), I would at least compare it to, oh, a drive along a cliff, or something. "Indie Rock" is rarely so intense.

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