Search This Blog

Loading...

Sunday, August 21, 2016

Nirvana: Nevermind (IAS #34)

Actually, a great album, whaddaya know:

12 comments:

  1. Great, great review, George. I've always loved "Drain You", as it's got the cutest, sweetest pop melody Cobain ever wrote (maybe), but I admit that it's a trifle compared to anything on the first side.

    ReplyDelete
  2. Good album, but I'm surprised you gave a thumbs up to innovation/influence after bashing its influence for the entire review.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Can't speak for GS (hopefully he will), but my guess is that he's referring to the power of their influence in all it's horrible glory. A souped-up punk band came over the corporate airwaves and literally knocked Michael Jackson off the top of the charts, sending the industry reeling for years; and they did it with bone-head chords and ever-so imitable structures.

      The innovation was the emotional authenticity of the songwriting -- an authenticity that no MJ or Prince or Bono or Axl Rose could touch. Even if their one (authentic) bloom accidentally pollinated whole fields of (inauthentic) weeds, that's still influence.

      I'm not a huge fan of Nirvana myself, but I sure appreciated their impact (Bleach is the real ass-kicker for me). I'm glad to see GS giving them more respect than he did in the old blog.

      Now, back to Cher reviews...

      Delete
    2. GS did not bash the influence. What's innovative is the particular combination of the influences with one specific goal: to channel Cobain's mental issues. That hadn't been done before.
      No matter what influence you point out, that predecessor still hadn't produced an album like this.

      Delete
  3. "who would you turn to if you wanted genuine kickass energy to rattle your world? Slayer?"
    Indeed that band already had scored two gold albums in the USA before Nirvana showed up. Not everybody joined the plastic party called the 1980's.

    ReplyDelete
  4. There is another huge difference between Eighties and Come as you Are: the drums. The first song has a straightforward 4 beats a bar pattern, like introduced by AC/DC ao.
    As I had not been aware of underground bands like Metallica and Faith Warning I had turned away from pop/rock in 1990. Yup, Kurt Cobain saved rock'n'roll for me, even if I don't think that high of this album.

    ReplyDelete
  5. Betraying my age: Floyd the Barber was a character on "The Andy Griffith Show". I guess you don't get the reruns in Russia.

    ReplyDelete
  6. When all this happened I was totally disconnected. I thought Nirvana was Pearl Jam. The ninties were childhoods end for me. I worked a nightshift and listened to Nevermind on my Walkman. I liked it but none of the others. I got Pearl Jam Stone Temple Pilots Temple of the Dog. I played guitar in highschool and went retro. I am enjoying music now because I can play it. It is a whole new world.

    ReplyDelete
  7. Still holds up. I get sick of people gushing about Cobain, and I always liked Alice in Chains and Soundgarden more, but no one can deny that Nirvana had three solid albums to their name.

    ReplyDelete
  8. I notice after your Blur/Oasis pun you say "Never Mind". Was that on purpose?!?

    ReplyDelete
  9. Somehow George always manages to avoid even hinting at an opinion about my first love, Soundgarden. Since he name dropped both Pearl Jam and Puddle of Mudd, I am now assuming a vast conspiracy. At least that's more palatable than him telling me my girlfriend is not as great as I think she is.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I can never understand how Screaming Trees and Mudhoney get left out of "grunge" conversations & comparisons either. But, heck yes, Soundgarden had some serious weapons: Sabathian metal power, intelligent lyrics, and Cornell's incredible voice. Definitely overlooked by GS on the old site. But Hole is there. Hole.

      Delete